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Pack Unpack

Pack, unpack, and pack again
"How many times have you done this?"
More than I can count on my hands.

Through the window, I see a cat.
It jumps from Dumpster to Dumpster.
It owns nothing; no need for movers or a "For Sale" ad.
Its kittens - it carries with its mouth, to where it's safe...
And look at the birds; they don't even move their nestlings,
Just set them in a makeshift nest, until they can fly...
Not I

Pack, unpack, and pack again
I keep getting better at this, my hands move like a machine,
Wrapping breakables in newspapers and embroidered linens.
When I unwrap them again, what year will it be?
Will the ink have stained the cloth ... will I care?
Will I take a moment to read about today?
What would have changed?

Pack, unpack, and pack again
I put things away that I have not used in years
Things I never used, thing I forgot I had,
Things that are not even mine ...
Inherited from my mother or father,
From the golden days of the family house,
When they entertained guests.

Pack, unpack, and pack again
Silverware, glass and copper
I should probably give it away
But it's pretty,
And it might be worth something one day ...
Perhaps it already is
I'll polish it and try to sell it ...
Too much to think about now-
Next time....

Pack, unpack, and pack again
What would I take if I had to flee,
What would I save if there's a fire,
Will I even remember what was once there,
Would I be relieved when it's gone?
What would I take if I only had a camel to carry things,
If I lived in a tent, if I lived without one?

Up in the mountain, where I spent my forty days,
I only carried a backpack with two changes of clothes,
One for working the garden, one for wandering the woods;
I carried two books I never read,
A pipe and things to write on - those I used.
It was plenty ... I missed nothing.

Pack, unpack, and pack again
To be free of attachment
I thought I was there,
But looking at the boxes
It just doesn't look like it ...

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In search for a pseudonym... I stumble upon Wilders' Fitna.

Fitna.  Is an Arabic word that is most commonly translated as ‘strife.’It could also mean 'enchantment' and even 'sin.' In its essence, it means: To make something appear differently than its nature.In the Quran, we are told that Moses ‘fatan’ the ropes and so they appeared as snakes.
Wikipedia does a good job at dissecting the word linguistically, so why recreate the wheel. I would however like to point here to the original meaning of the verb ‘fatana’ and that is: to burn.Adding to Wiki that it could thus be seen as an alchemical word… the burning of metal to distinguish the gold.Seeing through falsehood and finding the truth. Fitna is one of the many words that has been hijacked by the modern language.If words were to rebel, Fitna would stand in the frontlines. But in spite of the negative association of the word – or perhaps as a result of – Fitna is also a woman’s name (amongst certain groups like the Bedouins.)In that instance, it means that the woman is so beautif…