Skip to main content

Lessons from Nature



The lessons that mother nature tells us are boundless. Endless.
In the most simple ways, she gives us clues to living.

In a storm, you don't have to worry about trees that move with the wind like the pine, it's the ones that are completely solid that could fall.

Moving with the wind verses being stiff:
Adapting, going with, accepting, letting go, empathising, accommodating, flexible. These trees stay rooted.

You know the feeling - of trying to stay standing against all odds until you fall on your face.
Literally in my case:
When I was a little girl, I had the habit of falling unconscious. When I went with it, my body would collapse gently onto the floor. When I'd try to resist, I'd fall flat like a board and scar my face.
The fainting was sometimes caused by sunstroke, or the burning lights of the TV studio. I do not take well to heat, in spite of my middle eastern blood.
I sometimes brought fainting onto myself - without intent. I was a bit of a shaytaneh as a kid, or something of a monkey, trying to climb the wall, drink water too fast and send it in the wrong tube, fly over a chair and miss and get a clap on my chest and fall... etc.

Since then, I have learnt how not to knock myself out (be safer with risk taking- know my limits; take time drinking water; breath; do things consciously. As for avoiding fainting from external causes like sun or sickness.. I learnt to immediately lay on my back on the ground as soon as I feel it coming on.  Of course, the best thing to do is to avoid having to faint all together. Taking care of the self (eat well, sleep enough, rest, not do crazy things, avoid too much sun... etc.)

It the same with trees - falling could be avoided... or at least delayed.

Stewards of the forest learn to see the dangers before they arrive, pruning the trees that need to be pruned so that they do not fall, or that if they do fall, they won't take down the house with them. Removing the bad trees and planting good ones in their place. Tending the forest. Sometimes trees fall and there's nothing to do about it... but for all the other ones, it's worth the time. It takes a lot of time and work... but if we take care of her, she takes care of us.

Thank you nature.






Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Fire

The wind doth deceive me and your voice I hear in the tree shrubs Possessed am I with your eyes They pierce my womb and into earth's core I fall to your embrace عشقٌ وجنون Smile to me For you I set my eyes on fire With the lashes of your eyes Hide me in the wallpaper So I can stay near you Unseen

Challenging Tradition in a Traditional Society #1

There are some traditions that are worth upholding, but many have collected thick layers of dust so opaque that we can no longer see what was once beneath them. We mistake the dust for the essence, incessantly complaining about a'raf and wajibat, the rights and wrongs of our forefathers...but we play along to avoid ridicule and choose the chains of cowardice, prejudice, and misconception. Ignorance. I am not saying that all traditions are outdated and useless-far from it, in our Arab culture are jewels and treasures, and I am the first to call for preserving them. But let us stop for a moment and consider what we are heeding, rather than following blindly like grazing sheep. Sheep and goats: I am reminded of kindergarden and a song we learnt in school. The teacher would walk around the classroom singing: Ya Ganamati . And we'd respond: Ma Ma . ...Ghannou waraya : Ma Ma ..and so on and so forth. Very endearing, but also very telling. We grow up, Ma Ma-ing until we reach the

The elections: A short lived drive ....

Disclaimer: I'm paraphrasing and making generalizations. "Voting is not a right, it is a duty!" I sign out with a slogan, to later realize that I missed the registration deadline and therefore can't vote, neither 'present' in Jordan nor 'absentee' in the US. My political naz3ah came too late. "Nonetheless," I told myself "I'll still follow up on the local campaigns, to learn about the political games." But overnight, and as the landscape of the city changed, I was completely turned off. My political naz3ah did not last too long. At first, I was entertained by the ludicrous slogans, photoshopped pictures and contrived smiles. It made traffic bearable, and even amusing at times. Some confirming the unspoken divides and others playing the religious card; slogans with questionable connotations, and my favorite, "nothing to say". I take my hat off. The woman jabat-ha min il-akher. After all, it's all B.S., so m